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The most Hall of Famers


Sucky title, I know. But I've had a very irritating day and I don't care.

A few weeks ago, somebody on Twitter wondered which Topps flagship set featured the most Hall of Famers. Some speculated it was the early '80s. I speculated it was the mid-1960s.

After some frantic, imprecise researching and a few suggestions, I landed on 1969 as the set that likely has the most Hall of Famers.

The 1969 set has 44 players in the set that have reached the Hall of Fame.

Here they are:

Ernie Banks, Walter Alston, Joe Morgan, Roberto Clemente, Luis Aparicio, Jim "Catfish" Hunter, Lou Brock, Johnny Bench, Hank Aaron, Carl Yastrzemski, Leo Durocher, Jim Bunning, Willie Stargell, Willie Mays, Brooks Robinson, Bob Gibson, Don Sutton, Frank Robinson, Steve Carlton, Reggie Jackson, Tony Perez, Bill Mazeroski, Dick Williams, Phil Niekro, Juan Marichal, Harmon Killebrew, Orlando Cepeda, Earl Weaver, Don Drysdale, Al Kaline, Willie McCovey, Tom Seaver, Billy Williams, Red Schoendienst, Gaylord Perry, Mickey Mantle, Rod Carew, Nolan Ryan, Hoyt Wilhelm, Jim Palmer, Rollie Fingers, Fergie Jenkins, Ted Williams, Ron Santo

Of course, there are many other years to consult before I declare 1969 as THE Set of Hall of Famers.

And I certainly don't have the time to do all of that now.

So what I'm going to do is keep returning to this post as I have time to add to the list. And I'll alert you when I've added other years.

But I've already started with a couple of other years that I did in my rare free time.


1963 (33): Al Kaline, Hoyt Wilhelm, Carl Yastrzemski, Robin Roberts, Richie Ashburn, Walter Alston, Mickey Mantle, Luis Aparicio, Sandy Koufax, Willie Stargell, Stan Musial, Ron Santo, Willie Mays, Whitey Herzog, Warren Spahn, Dick Williams, Yogi Berra, Brooks Robinson, Billy Williams, Don Drysdale, Jim Bunning, Ernie Banks, Hank Aaron, Frank Robinson, Bob Gibson, Juan Marichal, Whitey Ford, Lou Brock, Willie McCovey, Harmon Killebrew, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Duke Snider



1970 (41): Carl Yastrzemski, Hoyt Wilhelm, Reggie Jackson, Earl Weaver, Harmon Killebrew, Phil Niekro, Billy Williams, Sparky Anderson, Juan Marichal, Ted Williams, Steve Carlton, Brooks Robinson, Fergie Jenkins, Walter Alston, Willie McCovey, Rod Carew, Leo Durocher, Tom Seaver, Luis Aparicio, Lou Brock, Red Schoendienst, Roberto Clemente, Tony Perez, Catfish Hunter, Jim Bunning, Jim Palmer, Willie Stargell, Hank Aaron, Rollie Fingers, Joe Morgan, Orlando Cepeda, Gaylord Perry, Willie Mays, Don Sutton, Ernie Banks, Bill Mazeroski, Al Kaline, Johnny Bench, Ron Santo, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan

Also, I know 1983 Topps has 38 Hall of Famers, but I'll add that here officially later.

Feel free to point out any missing players, as I'm sure to miss a few. I hope to have this be the definitive answer to this question.

You know, for those who have so little to do with their lives that they have to ask questions like these.

Finger pointed directly at me.

Comments

hiflew said…
Are you counting only active players? Because if not then 1976 has to be high on the list with its 10 All Time Greats subset.
hiflew said…
Never mind I just counted and it is 41 (31 minus the ATGs)
night owl said…
It'll be just actives (including active managers).
steelehere said…
If you want some help with the task, someone has created a bunch of quizes on Sporcle titled "19xx Topps Hall of Famers". All you have to do is click on each quiz and find out how many possible answers there are. Note: My prediction is actually going to be your all-time favorite set because of the MVP subset.

http://www.sporcle.com/search/?p=1&s=topps+hall+of+famers&cat_id=0&pub=0
Doc said…
I've got a spreadsheet with each HOFer's yearly base Topps card. You'll have fun with this topic.

Don't forget HOFer coaches from the 1960 and 1973 sets ;-)
deal said…
Thank You Thank You Thank You. This is stuff that one would expect to be out there and readily available, but I never realy see.
Anonymous said…
Every time I do a set "overview" I tally this up. I include subsets, i.e., turn back the clock, but either way I believe 1983 has 41 -

35 players and 6 managers:
Brett, Bench, Blyleven, Boggs, Carew, Carlton, Carter, Dawson, Eck, Fingers, Fisk, Gossage, Gwynn, Rickey, Reggie, Fergie, Molitor, Morgan, Murray, Niekro, Palmer, Perez, Perry, Rice, Ripken, Ryan, Sandberg, Schmidt, Seaver, Ozzie, Sutter, Sutton, Winfield, Yaz, Young
Sparky, Whitey, LaSorda, Frank Robinson, Weaver, Dick Williams
Anonymous said…
*Yount
Pro Set Cards said…
That Kaline card is a beauty!
CaptKirk42 said…
I always thought it would be one of the 1950s sets. Maybe they just have the most HOF Super Legends.
Commishbob said…
Greg, I believe the '59 set has 35 counting the League Prez and Campy tribute cards. I'll come back and revise this if I find anything to correct. Cool idea for a post, btw.

Frick NL Prez Card
Giles AL Prez Card
Snider
Fox
Spahn
Mays
Bunning
Musial
Slaughter
Koufax
Banks
Roberts
Aaron
Herzog
Mazerowski
F Robinson
B Robinson
Berra
Wynn
Mantle
Dick Williams
Ashburn
Aparicio
Sparky Anderson
Wilhelm
Kaline
Drysdale
Ford
Mathews
Clemente
Schoendienst
Gibson
Killebrew
Cepeda
Campy (Tribute Card)
Commishbob said…
Make it 36 in the '59 Topps set, I'd forgotten Larry Doby.
Fuji said…
You are one dedicated guy. This is why you're a legend in the blogworld. Can't wait to see the other years. I'm very curious to see which baseball card class had the least HOFers (excluding the past ten to fifteen years, of course).
sg488 said…
Great research,its the kinda stuff im always looking for ,but never know where to find it.

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