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Best of the 1970s

Here are the best Topps cards of the 1970s for each selected player, as voted on by readers:


Johnny Bench: 1976



Reggie Jackson: 1978



Manny Sanguillen: 1971



Don Sutton: 1970



Jerry Reuss: 1976



George Scott: 1970



Carl Yastrzemski: 1976



Jim Palmer: 1973



Roy White: 1971



Tom Seaver: 1974



Oscar Gamble: 1975



Ron Cey: 1975



Dock Ellis: 1973



Luis Tiant: 1974



Vida Blue: 1971



Hal McRae: 1976


Lou Brock: 1976

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