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Define the design

With help from you, dear reader, I am compiling a list that would give a title for each of the major baseball card releases in history -- well, at least the ones that I have cards of. Here is what I have so far: 

BOWMAN


1955 Bowman: the TV set
1991 Bowman: the purple slide rule set
1996 Bowman: the tweed jacket set
2003 Bowman: the red-bordered tombstone set
2005 Bowman: the brick wall set
2009 Bowman: the vertical Etch-a-Sketch set
2011 Bowman: the flat screen TV set

CLASSIC

1990 Classic: the Saved By The Bell set

DONRUSS

1982 Donruss: the bat and ball set
1983 Donruss: the bat and glove set

1986 Donruss: the Max Headroom set
1987 Donruss: the tire tread set
1988 Donruss: the Tron set
1989 Donruss: the rainbow border set
1990 Donruss: the red speckled cursive writing set (alternate name: the ladybug set)
1993 Donruss: the 3-D graphics 101 set
1996 Donruss: the metallic loin cloth set
2001 Donruss Classics: the silver bells set
2002 Donruss: the pinstriped curtain set

FLEER

1984 Fleer: the blue painter's tape set
1985 Fleer: the man in the gray flannel suit set
1987 Fleer: the blue freeze pop set
1987 Fleer Limited Edition: the Christmas toy soldier set
1988 Fleer: the barber shop pole set
1989 Fleer: the pinstriped gangster suit set
1991 Fleer: the yellow police tape set
1992 Fleer: the pistachio ice cream set
1995 Fleer: the acid trip set
2002 Fleer Tradition: the 1934 Goudey homage set

GOUDEY

1934 Goudey: the Lou Gehrig set

LEAF

1990 Leaf: the airplane tail fin set
1993 Leaf: the first-place set
2004 Leaf Certified Materials: the "Silver and Gold" Burl Ives set

PACIFIC

1995 Pacific: the gold diamond progression set
2000 Pacific Revolution: the New Millenium's Eve set

PINNACLE

1992 Pinnacle: the VHS cassette set
1993 Pinnacle: the ellipsis set

SCORE

1988 Score: the rainbow set
1989 Score: the baseball diamond set
1990 Score: the logo coin set
1993 Score: the tape measure set
1994 Score: the midnight blue border set
1995 Score: the dirt bike tire tread set
1996 Score: the torn photo set

TOPPS

1958 Topps: the scrapbook set
1959 Topps: the knothole set
1960 Topps: the horizontal set
1962 Topps: the wood panel set
1963 Topps: the James Bond set
1964 Topps: the large team banner set
1965 Topps: the pennant set
1968 Topps: the burlap set
1970 Topps: the gray border set
1971 Topps: the black border set
1972 Topps: the psychedelic tombstone set
1973 Topps: the silhouette set
1976 Topps: the horizontal test pattern set
1979 Topps: the ribbon set
1981 Topps: the hat set
1982 Topps: the hockey stick set
1983 Topps: the picture-in-picture set
1984 Topps: the vertical team name set
1987 Topps: the wood laminate set
1990 Topps: the Lichtenstein set
1993 Topps: the photo corners set
1996 Topps: the cyborg set
1997 Topps: the holly and the ivy set
2000 Topps: the silver border set
2001 Topps: the hospital scrubs set
2002 Topps: the brown mustard set
2005 Topps: the surname set
2007 Topps: the movie filmstrip set
2008 Topps: the circus circles set

2010 Topps: the wave set
2011 Topps: the baseball comet set
2012 Topps: the surfboard set
2013 Topps: the sea turtle set
2014 Topps: the file folder set
2015 Topps: the sonar set
2016 Topps: the TV graphics set
2017 Topps: the steel girders set
2018 Topps: the waterslide set



1994 Finest: the carnival midway set

UPPER DECK


1989 Upper Deck: the running-to-first set
1990 Upper Deck: the green-and-gold racing stripe set
1991 Upper Deck: the score-from-second set
1992 Upper Deck: the fastball set

1995 Upper Deck: the foil minimalism set
1996 Upper Deck: the upside-down Duracell set
1997 Upper Deck: the hardwood floor set
2002 Upper Deck: the white circuit board set
2006 Upper Deck Unique: the Polar Express set
2007 Upper Deck: the elevator doors set
2008 Upper Deck: the foil minimalism set, part 2
2008 Upper Deck Goudey: the Ken Griffey Jr. set
2009 Upper Deck: the rectangle set
2010 Upper Deck: the incognito set

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