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Life lessons

Everything I've learned, I've learned from baseball cards. ... What? You don't believe me? Well, here are just a few examples:

Be careful what you wish for, you might get it.


Don't bury the lead (who won this Series again?)

Don't count on the photographer to get your good side.

Speak softly and carry a big stick.

There are advantages to being left-handed.

Everything old is new again (thanks for the photo, Baseball Dad!)

(More life lessons from baseball cards to come).

Comments

JD's Daddy said…
Hey there,

Over the weekend I pulled a Russell Martin Numbered refracter from Topps Heritage and thought of your site. Did not know if you were interested. I also have a melting pot collection going back to the Hershiser days.

I have an image of that Martin at on my blog if you want to check it out.
BASEBALL DAD said…
Your welcome ! Very nice use of it on the card.
jacobmrley said…
I always loved the awkward angle of that 82 fleer Clark card, plus as a Jack Clark hatter, I like that he struck out and didn't like it much...

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