Sunday, April 28, 2019

Unspammy


I woke up late Saturday morning to discover that Topps had joined the usual suspects in spamming my inbox.

There, among the advertisements for walk-in tubs, weight-loss supplements and teeth-whiteners that had escaped the spam filter, was a breathless Topps message stating that cards were available of Vlad Guerrero Jr. only for the next 24 hours!

I had somehow managed to avoid most Topps Now advertising so I don't know why suddenly I was receiving these emails. Another one arrived earlier today. There were only 3 hours left!

At the exact moment that the second email arrived, I was online checking out the prices on my needs for the 1976 Kellogg's 3-D set. I can't think of two kinds of cards that are farther apart on the card spectrum. An underpriced oddball from the '70s that you could find in your cereal box or an overpriced slicked-up online exclusive, get it now or it's GONE FOREVER (not really).

Topps had become as useless to me as the spammer attempting to sell me life insurance. Neither knew what I really wanted. What I'd really buy, if I had the cash.

Fortunately, people who read my blog do know what cards I really like and three packages sent recently demonstrate that quite accurately.

I will start with a guy I traded with long ago from the Old School Breaks blog. John found a nifty 2019 Clayton Kershaw short-print and offered it up.


This is considered a Clayton Kershaw card and on the back Kershaw's stats are listed so I guess this is a variation card?

On the front, it could be the card of Manny Machado or Matt Kemp or Chase Utley. But since Kershaw is the only one whose face is shown that's still on the Dodgers I suppose Kershaw makes sense.

John sent along a few other Dodger cards:


I knew I needed the Bellinger card, but I was surprised to learn that I needed the other two cards, too. That's a 4-for-4 package!

This is what I want spammers. Not your sketchy home loan come-ons.

Another non-spammy envelope arrived recently from Commish Bob from The Five-Tool Collector blog.

He slipped a couple of very-much-wanted cards between these two protectors:


No offense to Topps Heritage or these two fine cards but I have a few of these already. I don't not have a few of these:




Yay! 1956 Topps wants!

I particularly like receiving the famed card of poor Schoony chasing down a ball that eluded him. What an interesting picture choice.

The Schoonmaker card features something offbeat on the back, too.


That is a several miscut back. I don't already own the Harry Brecheen cards. Can I cross that one off the list now, too?

Those are two terrific cards that meet collection needs that mean a whole lot to me right now. '56 Topps is never spam.

Finally, a package from Dennis of Too Many Verlanders that goes straight to my current collecting heart.


Weeeeeee! 1975 Topps buybacks!!

I have about half of these already, but the other half I don't! And that brings me up to 283 cards in my quest to complete a buyback version of the 1975 Topps set.

I especially like the Tommy Hutton card here just because my offer for that card has been declined twice on COMC and now I have the card for free so there, stupid seller. You lost out on your buck fifty or whatever I offered.

Dennis also sent a 2002 Elite card of Paul LoDuca that I needed but since Elite cards scan like suck, I'll avoid showing it.

But all of the cards in that very welcome envelope were decisively unspammy.

Speaking of that, while I was writing this, I received another email from Topps advertising the latest version of Topps Now cards.

It seems that I'm going to have to take some unsubscribe action against Topps. Or, better yet, mark it as spam.

Friday, April 26, 2019

Mood lifters


Every self-help outlet churns out the same list of mood lifters to their perpetually down-in-the-dumps readers.

It often goes something like this:

Exercise
Sleep
Get outdoors, particularly in the sun
Talk to a friend
Eat healthy foods

There is a whole sub-category of mood lifters such as music, movies, pets, shopping and travel, too.

But not once do I see anything in any self-help list that mentions baseball cards.

Baseball cards have boosted my mood more times than I can count. I'm currently in need of a mood-boost given my family situation and work situation (co-worker is on vacation, meaning I'm working six straight days). I've tried posting every single day this week in hopes of writing myself out of my mood. It hasn't quite worked, so I thought I'd go for the big guns: a selection of cards sent by Nick of Dime Boxes.

Anyone with that many flea markets and card shows at his disposal should do a fine job of lifting a fellow card-collector's mood. Take the Reggie Jackson storybook item for example. How can you stay gloomy staring at that? 1970 Topps won't allow it. Reggie Jackson won't allow it.


Nope, there are certain cards that are perfect mood lifters. Next to those pictures of grilled salmon and women performing yoga there should be photos of Kellogg's 3-D cards like this one.

I was just admiring the '75 Kellogg's McBride posted on Cardboard Junkie a week or two ago and -- bam -- a cracked up, full-baked McBride landed in my lap. As you know, I prefer my Kellogg's 3-D's a little tidier, but there's plenty of time for that. This one takes the edge off for now.


Same with this. The '78 Kellogg's set lands firmly in my oddball sweet spot. Want to know when I first fully appreciated the beauty of baseball cards in my cereal box, when I grasped the privilege of yanking a card from a box full of flakes? This is the set. This is the time.


If I'm going to complete the 1976 Hostess set as I fully intend to do, I will need to deal with the fact that Steve Garvey cards aren't easy to find in pristine shape. This looks quite a bit better than the other version of this card I own. And that lifts my mood.



Not every card is a mood-lifter, however, not even the ones that fill gaps in the collection as all three of these do. The top card is an ugly binder page ruiner, the middle card is a pointless foil parallel of a player most Dodger fans dislike, and the bottom pair is actually the same card, with Robinson on the front and Kershaw on the back. Ugh. At least they're both from the same team, unlike those '90s mood-ruiners.



Back to mood lifters. Four of the five 1970 OPC Dodgers that Nick sent filled holes and for a whole lot less cash than blowing 9 bucks on The Avengers tonight (I think that's what movies cost, I don't go to many).



Here's Reggie again, performing his mood-lifting act on a 1970 Topps All-Star card. It's positively smile-inducing.


Staying with 1970 but back to the oddballs, featuring an oddball team! Yay!



Sometimes my mood can be lifted when I can build an image pyramid with modern-card needs.



Or I'll get a special thrill out of noticing for the first time -- on this very often-used Jackie Robinson photo -- that there is no logo on his hat (which appears to be colorized here).


Minor league cards of Ramon Martinez make me happy. He has many from around 1989. This is one I didn't have already.


Or how about this 1961 card of Don Newcombe in such perfect shape. Why could that be?



Ah, I see. It's Gary Bunger's card. I've come across this several times with 1960s cards. Did every collector have his own stamp pad in the '60s? And did they believe that stamping their name on it would prevent people from taking it?



This glossy '89 Fleer card doesn't quite perk me up, just because I'll never be done with the junk wax Dodgers with stuff like this popping up.



And shiny? Well, yeah, sometimes shiny can pull me out of the dumps. But it has to be the right kind of shiny. This isn't quite it (excited to have a needed Shawn Green insert tho).

Let's try some over-the-top stuff, maybe that will work, huh?


How about a "triple-swatch" card of Rafael Nadal, featuring relics from three of the four majors? That is impressive.



This super-size card from 1997 Upper Deck is brand-new to me, too. My goodness. Storage question marks are hovering over my head.

As you can see baseball cards can lift your mood to various levels. Some work better than others depending on your collecting interests.

And if you search, you'll probably find one that lifts your mood better than all the others.

Here's that one for me:


That's a 1960 Bazooka card of Wally Moon.

I've never owned one of those cards, let alone one of Wally. I feel suitably boosted.

I won't say I'm back to being my usually perky night owl, but this helped a lot more than most of the things on those self-help lists.

Get baseball cards on that list, self-helpers. They DO work.

Thursday, April 25, 2019

C.A.: 1981 Fleer Tim Flannery

(I am posting this during the time of the NFL Draft, which probably isn't a wise programming move. Even though we will play up this event in the newspaper, I still can't figure out why people get so excited about the draft. It is bizarre that fans set aside time to watch people sit around and make picks. But then second-guessing has become a full-time online industry so I suppose it makes sense. This is Cardboard Appreciation and this is the 281st in a series):


I'm sure many of you have seen the Yahoo series "Old Baseball Cards," hosted by Mike Oz, on youtube or maybe on the Yahoo Sports site.

It's an interesting few minutes of Oz and a notable baseball player or manager opening packs of baseball cards from the '80s or '90s and then they trade some cards. You aren't going to learn a lot about cards -- I sometimes get annoyed by how little the player and Oz know about the packs and the cards they're opening, but then they don't run a baseball card blog. But often the players offer interesting nuggets about past teammates, opponents, etc.

Just recently, "Old Baseball Cards" featured its 100th episode with Pete Rose opening some packs with Oz. Say what you will about Rose, and many people including me have, but this was one of the better "Old Baseball Cards" that I've seen.

First of all, Rose opened five different packs during the video. Most players open just one and sometimes you can tell they want to get out of there. Rose wasn't in any hurry (still in the business of shilling himself) and they opened packs of '81 Fleer, '83 Topps, '86 Topps, '85 Donruss and '82 Fleer. He knew many of the players and he had factoids and stories about a lot of them.

The thing that impressed me most is that I learned something about a baseball card from Pete Rose.

Rose selected 1981 Fleer as the pack he wanted to open first, an excellent choice. (Oz picked 1983 Topps, another excellent choice). He had stuff to say about Tommy John, Willie Wilson, Jerry Koosman, Larry Herndon, Jeff Leonard, Hal McRae and even Julio Gonzalez. He also told a story about Davey Concepcion getting stuck in an operating dryer.

Then he pulled the card of Tim Flannery. But it wasn't the card shown at the top of this post. This was the card:


The image of Flannery on the card is reversed, which Rose caught right away. "I don't know what Flannery's doing with that right-handed stance, he was a left-hander," he said.

Oz didn't know anything about it, but checked the back, where Flannery was listed as a lefty and then checked the background and noted that the image was reversed as the lettering on the uniforms was backwards.

I'm not a 1981 Fleer error connoisseur. I know some of the errors in '81 Fleer, I know that there are many errors in '81 Fleer, but I don't know all of the errors in '81 Fleer. So this surprised me. I immediately went to my '81 Fleer binder to check out the reversed photo on my '81 Fleer Flannery.

That's when I discovered that the error had been corrected and there were two versions of the card. I have the corrected version. Rats.

Rose later blew away Oz with detailed information on a three-home run game off of Nino Espinosa, and that Randy Moffitt is Billie Jean King's brother (come on, Mike, every baseball card collector should know that).

I don't know if this was the best "Old Baseball Cards" episode. I just watched the one with Dave Winfield and that was pretty good, too. The Craig Counsell and Dusty Baker ones were great. (Also, Rays manager Kevin Cash has an impressive card collection). I've noticed that in the more recent episodes, the guests have gotten more into the spirit of the show.

 But for a player to teach me something about a baseball card, that just doesn't happen very often.

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

The year I became a bad team collector


That would be 2018.

It's been coming for awhile. Probably around 2015 or so I began to think "I can't do this anymore. I just can't keep up."

Even though from the beginning I always knew that there would be no way I could collect every Dodger card as a team collector, I still had hope for several years. There weren't that many parallels or that many inserts. Sure, there were a bunch of 1 of 1 cards, but I could ignore those easily enough.

Then it became a deluge. More and more parallels. More and more inserts. More and more variations. Cards from Panini that I didn't even like and parallels and variations of those. Then the online exclusives came. More and more online exclusives. Topps Now and the Living Set and current players on retro designs that were issued like every week and that weren't available at the store down the street. Then came the club-membership-type deals from Topps where you could sign up and Topps would make cards made exclusively for members only. Holy smokes, how am I ever going to get those? Whatever happened to cards being available to EVERYONE? (I do not like this "class system" of collecting that has developed).

I started falling behind on my team want lists. And not just falling behind, but not even bothering. I knew that there wasn't a team want list up for such-and-such a set and even though I had a little bit of time to add it, I just didn't do it. I didn't care.

Too much to keep track of, not enough interest, more interested in other card pursuits that weren't like trying to trap butterflies with a spoon.

For whatever reason, I recently decided to post on my want list my Dodgers needs from 2018 Panini Chronicles, that set is just bizarre enough to peak my interest. Here is what that came to:

Chronicles (Dodgers)

12-Buehler, 21-Kershaw, 36-Seager, 56-Bellinger

Classics: 6-Verdugo
Cornerstones: 29-Bellinger, 32-Kershaw
Crusade: 11-Verdugo, 21-Bellinger
Donruss Optic: 182-Farmer
Illusions: 25-Verdugo
Limited: 20-Kershaw
Phoenix: 1-Verdugo, 18-Bellinger
Prestige: 20-Bellinger, 25-Verdugo
Prizm: 13-Verdugo, 25-Seager
Revolution: 25-Bellinger
Rookies and Stars: 11-Bellinger
Score: 18-Bellinger, 19-Verdugo, 29-Buehler
Select: 8-Bellinger
Spectra: 3-Bellinger, 32-Kershaw, 33-Verdugo, 37-Buehler, 45-Farmer

Parallels: Any

(these are relics or autos):

Autographs: 9-Farmer
Signature Swatches: 7-Peters
Swatches: 17-Kershaw
Classic Singles: 3-Piazza, 15-Sheffield
Contenders Season Tickets: 13-Buehler, 14-Verdugo, 15-Farmer
Cornerstones: 11-Verdugo, 20-Bellinger
Heirs to the Throne: 1-Bellinger, 16-Seager
Panini Signatures: 16-Peters
Phoenix Signatures: 17-Taylor
Prizm Signatures: 6-Farmer
Reserve Materials: 11-Farmer, 14-Buehler, 21-Kershaw, 22-Seager
Rookie Jersey Collection: 9-Buehler, 15-Verdugo
Rookie Reserve Signatures: 9-Farmer, 11-Verdugo, 20-Buehler
Spectra Rookie Jersey Autographs: 11-Verdugo, 20-Buehler
Triple Threat Materials: 9-Farmer, 11-Verdugo, 20-Buehler

Goodness me, as my grandmother used to say. What the hell is that?

If you add up the number of players listed there, it comes to a grand total of 10. And three of those players appear only once. I am being asked to collect 56 cards featuring just 10 players (actually 58, two of the Chronicles Dodgers are in my collection already). And that's not including any of the many parallels.

What has team collecting become? That is not my kind of team collecting. I'm glad flagship and Heritage is still around as they still recognize team collecting as I know it. Some will say "just collect the team members from the sets that make sense to you," but I've operated for too long under the "collect them all" team philosophy and I can't ignore 12 to 15 sets (because that's what it would take) and feel comfortable with my collection.

So, because of the weird nature of some sets and the sheer number of parallels/variations/exclusives, I've pulled away more and more. I'm not even interested in buying the team sets all in one shot, mostly because the "just-be-done-with-it" mind-set doesn't jive with my enthusiasm for collecting.

If this sounds familiar to readers it may be because I've written a post about this already, fairly recently. But now, five months later, I'm officially seeing the results of my team-collecting apathy that really kicked in in 2018.

My neglect has created massive numbers of wants in my Dodger collection. While I was ignoring team collecting, Topps and Panini kept churning out cards without a break. There's no chance now of me catching up to what they've been creating in a frenzy.

And I have to rely on you guys to send me Dodger stuff that I might need, much of it things I had no idea existed.

I recently received a package of all 2018 Dodger cards from Jon of Community Gum. It was nice to have that feeling of filling holes in my team collection again.


Jon finally wiped out my 2018 Allen & Ginter Dodger base card needs, something that I used to take care of well within the calendar year of release. Took me much longer this time. But at least I had a want list up for this!



I did pretty good with keeping track of my Big League Baseball Dodger needs, too, even the parallels. This is probably because it was a new product that I could find at the nearby Target and relatively cheap. "Collecting-friendly" I call this. Basically the complete opposite of Panini Chronicles.



Finest? I still love these cards. And there's actually a want list. But I don't do much about trying to find them. These two cards help.



Then there's Archives. I have a 2018 want list for this, too. But Archives is tricky enough that there are always Dodgers cards that escape my notice. This is one of them. I'm sure glad I have it. That Verdugo-Buehler connection may make this item fairly significant in the near future.



OK, Panini time. This is where it gets weird.

If Panini is lucky, I post a Dodger want list. But I barely pay attention to it. Diamond Kings used to hold my interest a little. But after a few years, I've noticed that Panini keeps regenerating the same legends and it gets a bit tedious. I should never feel like another Pee Wee Reese card is tedious, but, yet, here we are.


Sometimes the Diamond King-esque cards work and sometimes they don't. This one is rather nice. The lack of logo and even the blue 10 does not bother me.



Now, the disaster that is Panini Donruss and Optic. Jon informed me that these are both variations. Imagine that! Variations in Panini Donruss! My assumption is that there are five different variations for each of these players in each of the sets (Donruss and Optic). And then multiple parallels of those. Will I bother to chase them down? Will I bother to put up a want list for them?

The team collector in me doesn't want me to say this but, truthfully, the answer is: no way. Not ever.


I admit some Optic inserts are nice and make me want them.

So, as you can tell, I am still on that borderline.

I still like the idea of being a team collector and I still like getting those very modern Dodger cards. But I often resent having to accumulate certain cards and am more often apathetic about most of what team-collecting has become.

Team collector night owl from 2006 to 2014 would see this and think that I have given up, that I am no longer fighting the good fight, that I am a bad team collector.

But I don't feel bad about it.

At all.

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

The most Hall of Famers, update 9


I'm sure many fans are happy to see more players being selected to the Hall of Fame the last few of years.

I am, too, if only to quiet the whining about it, somewhat. But one area where "more Hall of Famers per year" complicates things is in my exercise to find out which Topps flagship set features the most Hall of Famers.

The 2019 class is six people large, just like last year and just like 2014. That's a lot of additions to the sets for which I've already totaled the number of Hall of Famers. Throw in the new sets that I add every time I do this and this becomes a multiple-hour project.

But it's worth it, right?

Sure.

Meanwhile, I continue to discover errors in past Most Hall of Famers posts. I found a big one recently. I listed Pete Rose as being a Hall of Famer in the 1972 Topps set. Astonishingly, no one called me on that. Once I removed Rose, the '72 set then dropped out of a first-place tie with the 1969 and 1983 Topps sets for the most Hall of Famers. And that required me updating several posts, rewording things, etc. I told you this was a project.

Anyway, I have things in order -- for now -- and I am adding three more sets to the list. I have selected the Topps sets from 1959, 1971 and 2003. Let's see how they rank with the others I've done already and with the additions of Mariano Rivera, Roy Halladay, Edgar Martinez, Mike Mussina, Harold Baines and Lee Smith.


1956 (34): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Luis Aparicio, Richie Ashburn, Ernie Banks, Yogi Berra, Roy Campanella, Roberto Clemente, Larry Doby, Bob Feller, Whitey Ford, Nellie Fox, Warren Giles, Will Harridge, Monte Irvin, Al Kaline, George Kell, Harmon Killebrew, Sandy Koufax, Bob Lemon, Mickey Mantle, Eddie Mathews, Willie Mays, Pee Wee Reese, Phil Rizzuto, Robin Roberts, Jackie Robinson, Red Schoendienst, Enos Slaughter, Duke Snider, Warren Spahn, Hoyt Wilhelm, Ted Williams, Early Wynn


1959 (36): Hank Aaron, Sparky Anderson, Luis Aparicio, Richie Ashburn, Ernie Banks, Yogi Berra, Jim Bunning, Roy Campanella, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Larry Doby, Don Drysdale, Al Kaline, Whitey Ford, Nellie Fox, Ford Frick, Warren Giles, Whitey Herzog, Harmon Killebrew, Sandy Koufax, Eddie Mathews, Mickey Mantle, Willie Mays, Bill Mazeroski, Stan Musial, Robin Roberts, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Red Schoendienst, Enos Slaughter, Duke Snider, Warren Spahn, Casey Stengel, Hoyt Wilhelm, Dick Williams, Early Wynn



1960 (39): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Sparky (George) Anderson, Luis Aparicio, Luke Appling, Richie Ashburn, Ernie Banks, Yogi Berra, Jim Bunning, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Bill Dickey, Don Drysdale, Whitey Ford, Nellie Fox, Joe Gordon, Bob Gibson, Whitey Herzog, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Sandy Koufax, Bob Lemon, Al Lopez, Mickey Mantle, Bill Mazeroski, Eddie Mathews, Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Stan Musial, Robin Roberts, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Red Schoendienst, Duke Snider, Warren Spahn, Casey Stengel, Hoyt Wilhelm, Dick Williams, Carl Yastrzemski



1963 (35): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Luis Aparicio, Richie Ashburn, Ernie Banks, Yogi Berra, Lou Brock, Jim Bunning, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Don Drysdale, Whitey Ford, Bob Gibson, Whitey Herzog, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Sandy Koufax, Mickey Mantle, Juan Marichal, Bill Mazeroski, Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Stan Musial, Robin Roberts, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Ron Santo, Duke Snider, Warren Spahn, Willie Stargell, Joe Torre, Hoyt Wilhelm, Billy Williams, Dick Williams, Carl Yastrzemski



1968 (42): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Luis Aparicio, Ernie Banks, Johnny Bench, Lou Brock, Jim Bunning, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Don Drysdale, Bob Gibson, Jim Hunter, Fergie Jenkins, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Tony LaRussa, Mickey Mantle, Juan Marichal, Eddie Mathews, Willie Mays, Bill Mazeroski, Willie McCovey, Joe Morgan, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ron Santo, Red Schoendienst, Tom Seaver, Willie Stargell, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Hoyt Wilhelm, Billy Williams, Dick Williams, Carl Yastrzemski



1969 (47): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Luis Aparicio, Ernie Banks, Johnny Bench, Lou Brock, Jim Bunning, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Bobby Cox, Don Drysdale, Leo Durocher, Rollie Fingers, Bob Gibson, Joe Gordon, Jim Hunter, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Mickey Mantle, Juan Marichal, Willie Mays, Bill Mazeroski, Willie McCovey, Joe Morgan, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ron Santo, Red Schoendienst, Tom Seaver, Willie Stargell, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Earl Weaver, Hoyt Wilhelm, Billy Williams, Dick Williams, Ted Williams, Carl Yastrzemski



1970 (43): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Sparky Anderson, Luis Aparicio, Ernie Banks, Johnny Bench, Lou Brock, Jim Bunning, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Leo Durocher, Rollie Fingers, Bob Gibson, Jim Hunter, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Juan Marichal, Willie Mays, Bill Mazeroski, Willie McCovey, Joe Morgan, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ron Santo, Red Schoendienst, Tom Seaver, Willie Stargell, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Earl Weaver, Hoyt Wilhelm, Billy Williams, Ted Williams, Carl Yastrzemski



1971 (46): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Sparky Anderson, Luis Aparicio, Ernie Banks, Johnny Bench, Bert Blyleven, Lou Brock, Jim Bunning, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Leo Durocher, Rollie Fingers, Bob Gibson, Jim (Catfish) Hunter, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Bob Lemon, Juan Marichal, Bill Mazeroski, Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Joe Morgan, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ron Santo, Red Schoendienst, Tom Seaver, Willie Stargell, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Earl Weaver, Hoyt Wilhelm, Billy Williams, Dick Williams, Ted Williams, Carl Yastrzemski



1972 (46): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Sparky Anderson, Luis Aparicio, Johnny Bench, Bert Blyleven, Lou Brock, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Leo Durocher, Rollie Fingers, Carlton Fisk, Bob Gibson, Jim Hunter, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Tony La Russa, Bob Lemon, Juan Marichal, Willie Mays, Bill Mazeroski, Willie McCovey, Joe Morgan, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Gaylord Perry, Tony Perez, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson,  Nolan Ryan, Ron Santo, Red Schoendienst, Tom Seaver, Willie Stargell, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Earl Weaver, Hoyt Wilhelm, Billy Williams, Dick Williams, Ted Williams, Carl Yastrzemski 



1975 (43): Hank Aaron, Walt Alston, Sparky Anderson, Johnny Bench, Yogi Berra, George Brett, Lou Brock, Bert Blyleven, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Gary Carter, Rollie Fingers, Carlton Fisk, Bob Gibson, Rich Gossage, Jim "Catfish" Hunter, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins; Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Willie McCovey, Joe Morgan, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Jim Rice, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ron Santo, Mike Schmidt, Red Schoendienst, Tom Seaver, Willie Stargell, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Earl Weaver, Billy Williams, Dick Williams, Dave Winfield, Carl Yastrzemski, Robin Yount


1978 (44): Sparky Anderson, Johnny Bench, Bert Blyleven, Lou Brock, George Brett, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Gary Carter, Bobby Cox, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Rollie Fingers, Carlton Fisk, Rich Gossage, Whitey Herzog, Jim Hunter, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Tom Lasorda, Bob Lemon, Willie McCovey, Paul Molitor, Joe Morgan, Jack Morris, Eddie Murray, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Jim Rice, Brooks Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Mike Schmidt, Tom Seaver, Willie Stargell, Bruce Sutter, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Alan Trammell, Earl Weaver, Dick Williams, Dave Winfield, Carl Yastrzemski, Robin Yount


1982 (38): Harold Baines, Johnny Bench, Bert Blyleven, George Brett, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Gary Carter, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Rollie Fingers, Carlton Fisk, Rich Gossage, Rickey Henderson, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Paul Molitor, Joe Morgan, Jack Morris, Eddie Murray, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Tim Raines, Jim Rice, Cal Ripken (future stars), Nolan Ryan, Mike Schmidt, Tom Seaver, Lee Smith, Ozzie Smith, Willie Stargell, Bruce Sutter, Don Sutton, Alan Trammell, Dave Winfield, Carl Yastrzemski, Robin Yount



1983 (49): Sparky Anderson, Harold Baines, Johnny Bench, Bert Blyleven, Wade Boggs, George Brett, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Gary Carter, Bobby Cox, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Rollie Fingers, Carlton Fisk, Rich Gossage, Tony Gwynn, Rickey Henderson, Whitey Herzog, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Tony LaRussa, Tom Lasorda, Paul Molitor, Joe Morgan, Jack Morris, Eddie Murray, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Tim Raines, Jim Rice, Cal Ripken, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ryne Sandberg, Mike Schmidt, Tom Seaver, Lee Smith, Ozzie Smith, Don Sutton, Bruce Sutter, Joe Torre, Alan Trammell, Earl Weaver, Dick Williams, Dave Winfield, Carl Yastrzemski, Robin Yount



1987 (40): Sparky Anderson, Harold Baines, Yogi Berra, Bert Blyleven, Wade Boggs, George Brett, Steve Carlton, Gary Carter, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Carlton Fisk, Rich Gossage, Tony Gwynn, Rickey Henderson, Whitey Herzog, Reggie Jackson, Barry Larkin, Tony LaRussa, Tom Lasorda, Paul Molitor, Jack Morris, Eddie Murray, Phil Niekro, Kirby Puckett, Tim Raines, Jim Rice, Cal Ripken, Nolan Ryan, Ryne Sandberg, Mike Schmidt, Tom Seaver, Lee Smith, Ozzie Smith, Bruce Sutter, Don Sutton, Alan Trammell, Earl Weaver, Dick Williams, Dave Winfield, Robin Yount



1990 (39): Roberto Alomar, Sparky Anderson, Harold Baines, Craig Biggio, Bert Blyleven, Wade Boggs, George Brett, Gary Carter, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Carlton Fisk, Tom Glavine, Ken Griffey Jr., Tony Gwynn, Rickey Henderson, Whitey Herzog, Randy Johnson, Barry Larkin, Tony LaRussa, Tom Lasorda, Greg Maddux, Edgar Martinez, Paul Molitor, Jack Morris, Eddie Murray, Kirby Puckett, Tim Raines, Jim Rice, Frank Robinson, Cal Ripken, Nolan Ryan, Ryne Sandberg, Lee Smith, Ozzie Smith, John Smoltz, Frank Thomas, Alan Trammell, Dave Winfield, Robin Yount

 
1992 (42): Roberto Alomar, Sparky Anderson, Jeff Bagwell, Harold Baines, Craig Biggio, Bert Blyleven, Wade Boggs, George Brett, Gary Carter, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Carlton Fisk, Tom Glavine, Rich Gossage, Ken Griffey Jr., Tony Gwynn, Randy Johnson, Chipper Jones, Barry Larkin, Tony La Russa, Tom Lasorda, Greg Maddux, Edgar Martinez, Paul Molitor, Jack Morris, Eddie Murray, Mike Mussina, Kirby Puckett, Tim Raines, Cal Ripken, Ivan Rodriguez, Nolan Ryan, Ryne Sandberg, Lee Smith, Ozzie Smith, John Smoltz, Frank Thomas, Jim Thome, Joe Torre, Alan Trammell, Dave Winfield, Robin Yount


1993 (43): Roberto Alomar, Sparky Anderson, Jeff Bagwell, Harold Baines, Craig Biggio, Bert Blyleven, Wade Boggs, George Brett, Gary Carter, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Carlton Fisk, Tom Glavine, Ken Griffey Jr., Tony Gwynn, Rickey Henderson, Trevor Hoffman, Randy Johnson, Chipper Jones, Barry Larkin, Tony LaRussa, Greg Maddux, Edgar Martinez, Pedro Martinez, Paul Molitor, Jack Morris, Eddie Murray, Mike Mussina, Mike Piazza, Kirby Puckett, Tim Raines, Cal Ripken Jr., Ivan Rodriguez, Nolan Ryan, Ryne Sandberg, Lee Smith, Ozzie Smith, John Smoltz, Alan Trammell, Frank Thomas, Jim Thome, Dave Winfield, Robin Yount



1996 (33): Roberto Alomar, Jeff Bagwell, Harold Baines, Craig Biggio, Wade Boggs, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Tom Glavine, Ken Griffey Jr., Vladimir Guerrero, Tony Gwynn, Rickey Henderson, Trevor Hoffman, Randy Johnson, Chipper Jones, Barry Larkin, Greg Maddux, Edgar Martinez, Pedro Martinez, Paul Molitor, Eddie Murray, Mike Mussina, Mike Piazza, Kirby Puckett, Tim Raines, Cal Ripken, Ivan Rodriguez, Ryne Sandberg, Lee Smith, Ozzie Smith, John Smoltz, Frank Thomas, Jim Thome


2000 (27): Roberto Alomar, Jeff Bagwell, Harold Baines, Craig Biggio, Wade Boggs, Tom Glavine, Ken Griffey Jr., Vladimir Guerrero, Tony Gwynn, Roy Halladay, Rickey Henderson, Trevor Hoffman, Randy Johnson, Chipper Jones, Barry Larkin, Edgar Martinez, Pedro Martinez, Greg Maddux, Mike Mussina, Mike Piazza, Tim Raines, Cal Ripken, Ivan Rodriguez, Mariano Rivera, John Smoltz, Frank Thomas, Jim Thome



2003 (26): Roberto Alomar, Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Bobby Cox, Tom Glavine, Ken Griffey Jr., Vladimir Guerrero, Roy Halladay, Rickey Henderson, Trevor Hoffman, Randy Johnson, Chipper Jones, Barry Larkin, Tony LaRussa, Greg Maddux, Edgar Martinez, Pedro Martinez, Mike Mussina, Mike Piazza, Mariano Rivera, Frank Robinson, Ivan Rodriguez, John Smoltz, Frank Thomas, Jim Thome, Joe Torre

I think the 2003 set did pretty good for its debut here. It features four of the 2019 Hall of Famers.

The set that received the biggest boost from the most recent Hall of Fame class is 2000 Topps, which added five Hall of Fame names (everyone except Lee Smith). The 1992, 1993 and 1996 sets added four Hall of Fame names. And the 1983 set pulled away from 1969 Topps with Harold Baines and Lee Smith to improve to 49 Hall of Famers total, the most so far.

As always, if I missed someone, let me know. It's very easy to miss a name, even when I'm double-checking.

I still want to try to do this more than once a year. The next time, I'd like to take care of a couple sets from the 1960s or 1980s. We'll see how that goes.