Tuesday, August 5, 2014

I know why I received some of these cards and I don't know why I received others


Cliff from Capewood's Collections and I trade cards every summer. I kind of like the way he does trades: reserve a time period for them and then go nuts at that time. It frees up the rest of the year for, you know ... life.

So, recently he sent a stack of cards and for most of them I knew exactly why he sent them. They were Dodgers. I collect Dodgers. Therefore, I need those Dodgers.

But there were others that perplexed me.

I'll get to those later. But first: Dodgers.


I'll start with the greatest pitcher of my lifetime. Yes, I'm ready to say that now. Dwight Gooden couldn't keep it together and I wasn't paying attention during Steve Carlton's 1972 season. I suppose someone could mention Nolan Ryan, Roger Clemens or Randy Johnson, but really from where I'm standing I think the only person he needs to beat out for the title is Greg Maddux. Give Kershaw a few more years like the ones he's had and it'll be his.


OK, I'm about to start a rant that will make me hate myself.

First, I am very happy that Don Sutton is in Allen and Ginter this year and that he is in there as a Dodger, instead of an Astro or Brewer or, god forbid, an Angel. I am very, very happy. I want to stress that. Very happy. Very. And that's why I'm gonna hate myself for saying this, but:

I don't know this Don Sutton.

This Don Sutton is from around 1969. There have been a lot of photos on baseball cards over the last 10 years or so of Sutton during his younger years. At first it was charming, but now it's almost annoying. Sutton did his finest work in the 1970s, when he had his famous and fabulous perm. Show me that famous perm! I don't need to see Ears Sutton! I was only 3 years old then! Give me Perm Sutton! Give me the '70s, man!

All right, that wasn't too bad. I don't hate myself nearly as much as I thought. For this anyway.


Here is a super shiny diecut from last year's Chrome set. Matt Kemp will join the Adrian Gonzalez version that I have in the binder. Or I may keep it out for when I'm feeling stabby. I'm convinced that these things really could do damage in the right kind of setting ... or wrong kind of setting ... or with enough pharmaceuticals ... never mind, forget I said any of that. All of the corners on that thing are very smooth and NOT pokey at all.


OK, now we've reached the "why did I get this" portion of the post.

Here is why I think I received this non-Dodgers card:

This is a card of Jeff King -- who looked nothing like he does here during his major league career -- who I interviewed during a baseball game once. I wrote a post on it, and I'm assuming that Cliff remembered that and that's why he sent the card.

Or it could be that he just threw it in there because what the hell is he going to do with this?


OK, why did I get this card?

I think this is an easy one. It was confused for a Dodgers card. Happens all the time with Royals cards. I wrote a post about that, too.

Fortunately this card is from 1994 Fleer, which I like quite a bit and have far too little of -- not that I am collecting it, I always must insert that disclaimer for fear a dump truck will appear tomorrow on my property and bomb the driveway with a six-foot pile of '94 Fleer.


Now this stumper: Why did I get this card?

I have no idea.

The possibilities:

A) Cliff know my secret love for '88 Fleer that I hope I have never professed on this blog because see dump truck above.

B) The 75th anniversary of Fenway Park patch is too cool to leave out of a card package.

C) No. 42 is Jackie Robinson's number.

D) Mustaches rule.

E) All of the above.

The answer is E, of course.

Thanks, Cliff for the Dodgers and the non-Dodger mystery cards. I enjoy doing this every summer. Here's to another deal next year. When life permits, of course.

10 comments:

  1. I think you're underrating how good Randy Johnson was. Kershaw is great - but Johnson's stretch from 99-02 was ridiculous. He had an ERA in the low-mid 2's every year. This was 99-02 when the average score felt like it was

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  2. When Kershaw has the yearly award for pitchers named after him, then we talk. A meer 421 wins to go.

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    1. Cy Young did not pitch during my lifetime. I ain't that old.

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  3. I have to agree with Adam E. When Pedro pitched, it wasn't just a baseball game, it was an event. Kershaw's pretty damn good, though.

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  4. Kershaw is a beast! There's a part of me that wants to honor the man by starting a small PC of him.

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  5. You guys are underestimating the greatness of Bob Walk. In all seriousness Kershaw is the man. A few more years of putting up numbers I will consider him an all time great. Until then he is still a shade below the Big Unit, Maddux and Pedro.

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  6. OK, let's try to explain those other cards. Jeff King: for some inexplicable reason, whenever I see a Jeff King card, I think Matt Kemp. Crazy, I know. That's why you got the King card, although I like your reason better. The Fleer 94 card: Yeah, I'm pretty sure I thought it was a Dodger card. I take all my unwanted cards and sort them into teams without looking real closely at them. Ed Romero: Let's got with "E".

    And please, let's not underestimate Bob Walk. Although he is primarily associated with the Pirates, he was a Phillie in his 1980 rookie season and won the first game of the 1980 World Series, despite giving up 6 earned runs in the first 4 innings.

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