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Simba ... and the most Hall of Famers, update 10


One of my childhood favorites was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame yesterday.

I haven't been a fan of the Cardinals for decades, but there was a period during the '70s and early '80s when I rooted for them quietly. Some of my favorite cards were Cardinals, players like Lou Brock, Keith Hernandez, Bake McBride, Al Hrabosky and ... Ted Simmons.

From the moment I saw his 1975 Topps "Dude Looks Like a Lady" card, owned by the cool kid up the street, something spoke to me about this Simmons character. His cards were pretty awesome and, looking at his stats on the back -- whoa! -- he was GOOD.

From there I thought Simmons never received the attention he should have gotten. Overshadowed by Johnny Bench in the National League, and by Fisk and Munson in the American League, Simmons hit the stuffing out of pitchers, all while balancing it with being the Cardinals' primary catcher.

Simmons, along with Bench and Fisk and Manny Sanguillen and others, was part of a '70s emergence among catchers, proving that you didn't have to be dumpy and hit .220 to be a catcher. Simmons didn't hit for the power that Bench did, but St. Louis could count on him for double figures in homers each year and -- this was freakish at the time -- he could hit above .300! Repeatedly! Catchers just didn't do that then.

Simmons hit 16 home runs in 1972. That broke the Cardinals team record for catchers. That's right, just 16 homers broke the record of a team that had been around for almost a century. The previous St. Louis record for catchers was 14.

This is what Simmons was doing to the game. Like Bench, he was altering it.

By the '90s, all kinds of catchers could hit. Mike Piazza, Craig Biggio, Ivan Rodriguez. It was no big deal anymore. Perhaps with that backdrop, when Simmons came up for Hall of Fame voting for the first time in 1994, he received just 17 votes and didn't appear on the ballot again. In fairness to Simmons, the '94 ballot contained a significant number of future Hall of Famers and as I've said many, many times, the Hall of Fame voting rules are very restrictive. The current committees are trying to correct that, but again the process is too painstaking for many.

Simmons and former Players Union leader Marvin Miller both deservedly were voted in, finally. But all I saw from Twitter last night was endless crabbing about the players who DIDN'T get voted through.

I get bored by this kind of bitching. First of all, it's a disservice to the people who did get called. Why spoil their day with complaining? Second, the repeated whining about who the Hall has left out again plays right into the Hall's hands. They make the voting difficult so people will talk, and when people talk, it generates publicity, and when publicity is generated, money gets made. And the Hall thrives for another day.

I prefer to celebrate who gets in the Hall (although I have been known to crab for special worthy causes). And for me, it was all about Simmons yesterday.

I've pulled out a few of my favorite Ted Simmons cards. I'm sure you've seen them before, but let's view them again:


Simmons just a handful of years into his career is looking completely bad-ass on his 1974 Topps card. And in case you weren't really sure, the cartoon on the back exclaims: Ted enjoys riding motorcycles as cartoon Ted burns past at what's likely a highly illegal rate of speed.



Ted Simmons was a competitive son-of-a-gun. He wasn't afraid to fight, once going fist-to-fist with teammate John Denny, but everything in this scene is sun-soaked and bubbly. It's obviously spring training. There are folding chairs in the background. FOLDING CHAIRS! Ted is delighted.



Simmons was dealt to the Brewers because he didn't get along with manager Whitey Herzog (there was a lot of not getting along with the manager when Whitey was running the show). This made me a little bit sad.

But the Brewers were good, too, and we were able to see Simmons transform into more of a elder statesman, who played some first base and was a productive designated hitter. He was part of those '82 Brewers I enjoyed so much. He's one of those players who ended up playing his former team in a World Series not long after he was traded by them.


Man, that hair. Look at that!

This is from the 1976 SSPC set and really shows you some of that '70s flavor. Simmons played on the same team as Bake McBride, Al Hrabosky, Lynn McGlothen, Hernandez, I'm sure there were some parties.



I have to show this card because I'm at the very end of completing this set. The final card for the set is on its way to me. And speaking of the final card, Ted Simmons is card No. 57 in the 1976 Kellogg's set, which is the final card.

Every one of the cards in this set is spectacular and I am impressed by everyone. But again, Simmons is one of the few whose hobby on the back is: motorcycles.

So, with Simmons going into the Hall this summer, that means another Hall of Famer to add to the sets from 1971 through 1989.

I've added Simmons to each of the sets that I've tallied so far, and I'm adding one more, which is the 1973 Topps set, since I'm very close to completing that one, too. Here is the updated compilation:



1956 (34): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Luis Aparicio, Richie Ashburn, Ernie Banks, Yogi Berra, Roy Campanella, Roberto Clemente, Larry Doby, Bob Feller, Whitey Ford, Nellie Fox, Warren Giles, Will Harridge, Monty Irvin, Al Kaline, George Kell, Harmon Killebrew, Sandy Koufax, Bob Lemon, Mickey Mantle, Eddie Mathews, Willie Mays, Pee Wee Reese, Phil Rizzuto, Robin Roberts, Jackie Robinson, Red Schoendienst, Enos Slaughter, Duke Snider, Warren Spahn, Hoyt Wilhelm, Ted Williams, Early Wynn



1959 (36): Hank Aaron, Sparky Anderson, Luis Aparicio, Richie Ashburn, Ernie Banks, Yogi Berra, Jim Bunning, Roy Campanella, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Larry Doby, Don Drysdale, Al Kaline, Whitey Ford, Nellie Fox, Ford Frick, Warren Giles, Whitey Herzog, Harmon Killebrew, Sandy Koufax, Eddie Mathews, Mickey Mantle, Willie Mays, Bill Mazeroski, Stan Musial, Robin Roberts, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Red Schoendienst, Enos Slaughter, Duke Snider, Warren Spahn, Casey Stengel, Hoyt Wilhelm, Dick Williams, Early Wynn



1960 (36): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Sparky Anderson, Luis Aparicio, Richie Ashburn, Ernie Banks, Yogi Berra, Jim Bunning, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Don Drysdale, Whitey Ford, Nellie Fox, Joe Gordon, Bob Gibson, Whitey Herzog, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Sandy Koufax, Al Lopez, Mickey Mantle, Bill Mazeroski, Eddie Mathews, Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Stan Musial, Robin Roberts, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Red Schoendienst, Duke Snider, Warren Spahn, Casey Stengel, Hoyt Wilhelm, Dick Williams, Carl Yastrzemski



1963 (35): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Luis Aparicio, Richie Ashburn, Ernie Banks, Yogi Berra, Lou Brock, Jim Bunning, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Don Drysdale, Whitey Ford, Bob Gibson, Whitey Herzog, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Sandy Koufax, Mickey Mantle, Juan Marichal, Bill Mazeroski, Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Stan Musial, Robin Roberts, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Ron Santo, Duke Snider, Warren Spahn, Willie Stargell, Joe Torre, Hoyt Wilhelm, Billy Williams, Dick Williams, Carl Yastrzemski



1968 (42): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Luis Aparicio, Ernie Banks, Johnny Bench, Lou Brock, Jim Bunning, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Don Drysdale, Bob Gibson, Jim Hunter, Fergie Jenkins, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Tony La Russa, Mickey Mantle, Juan Marichal, Eddie Mathews, Willie Mays, Bill Mazeroski, Willie McCovey, Joe Morgan, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ron Santo, Red Schoendienst, Tom Seaver, Willie Stargell, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Hoyt Wilhelm, Billy Williams, Dick Williams, Carl Yastrzemski



1969 (47): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Luis Aparicio, Ernie Banks, Johnny Bench, Lou Brock, Jim Bunning, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Bobby Cox, Don Drysdale, Leo Durocher, Rollie Fingers, Bob Gibson, Joe Gordon, Jim Hunter, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Mickey Mantle, Juan Marichal, Willie Mays, Bill Mazeroski, Willie McCovey, Joe Morgan, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ron Santo, Red Schoendienst, Tom Seaver, Willie Stargell, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Earl Weaver, Hoyt Wilhelm, Billy Williams, Dick Williams, Ted Williams, Carl Yastrzemski



1970 (43): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Sparky Anderson, Luis Aparcio, Ernie Banks, Johnny Bench, Lou Brock, Jim Bunning, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Leo Durocher, Rollie Fingers, Bob Gibson, Jim Hunter, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Juan Marichal, Willie Mays, Bill Mazeroski, Willie McCovey, Joe Morgan, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ron Santo, Red Schoendienst, Tom Seaver, Willie Stargell, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Earl Weaver, Hoyt Wilhelm, Billy Williams, Ted Williams, Carl Yastrzemski



1971 (47): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Sparky Anderson, Luis Aparicio, Ernie Banks, Johnny Bench, Bert Blyleven, Lou Brock, Jim Bunning, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Leo Durocher, Rollie Fingers, Bob Gibson, Jim (Catfish) Hunter, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Bob Lemon, Juan Marichal, Bill Mazeroski, Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Joe Morgan, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ron Santo, Red Schoendienst, Tom Seaver, Ted Simmons, Willie Stargell, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Earl Weaver, Hoyt Wilhelm, Billy Williams, Dick Williams, Ted Williams, Carl Yastrzemski



1972 (47): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Sparky Anderson, Luis Aparicio, Johnny Bench, Bert Blyleven, Lou Brock, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Leo Durocher, Rollie Fingers, Carlton Fisk, Bob Gibson, Jim Hunter, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Tony La Russa, Bob Lemon, Juan Marichal, Willie Mays, Bill Mazeroski, Willie McCovey, Joe Morgan, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Gaylord Perry, Tony Perez, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ron Santo, Red Schoendienst, Tom Seaver, Willie Stargell, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Earl Weaver, Hoyt Wilhelm, Billy Williams, Dick Williams, Ted Williams, Carl Yastrzemski



1973 (46): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Sparky Anderson, Luis Aparicio, Johnny Bench, Yogi Berra, Bert Blyleven, Lou Brock, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Leo Durocher, Rollie Fingers, Carlton Fisk, Rich Gossage, Bob Gibson, Whitey Herzog, Jim Hunter, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Juan Marichal, Eddie Mathews, Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Joe Morgan, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Gaylord Perry, Tony Perez, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ron Santo, Red Schoendienst, Tom Seaver, Ted Simmons, Willie Stargell, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Earl Weaver, Billy Williams, Dick Williams, Carl Yastrzemski



1975 (44): Hank Aaron, Walter Alston, Sparky Anderson, Johnny Bench, Yogi Berra, George Brett, Lou Brock, Bert Blyleven, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Gary Carter, Rollie Fingers, Carlton Fisk, Bob Gibson, Rich Gossage, Jim Hunter, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Al Kaline, Harmon Killebrew, Willie McCovey, Joe Morgan, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Jim Rice, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ron Santo, Mike Schmidt, Red Schoendienst, Tom Seaver, Willie Stargell, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Earl Weaver, Billy Williams, Dick Williams, Dave Winfield, Carl Yastrzemski, Robin Yount.



1978 (45): Sparky Anderson, Johnny Bench, Bert Blyleven, Lou Brock, George Brett, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Gary Carter, Bobby Cox, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Rollie Fingers, Carlton Fisk, Rich Gossage, Whitey Herzog, Jim Hunter, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Tom Lasorda, Bob Lemon, Willie McCovey, Paul Molitor, Joe Morgan, Jack Morris, Eddie Murray, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Jim Rice, Brooks Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Mike Schmidt, Tom Seaver, Ted Simmons, Willie Stargell, Bruce Sutter, Don Sutton, Joe Torre, Alan Trammell, Earl Weaver, Dick Williams, Dave Winfield, Carl Yastrzemski, Robin Yount



1982 (39): Harold Baines, Johnny Bench, Bert Blyleven, George Brett, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Gary Carter, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Rollie Fingers, Carlton Fisk, Rich Gossage, Rickey Henderson, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Paul Molitor, Joe Morgan, Jack Morris, Eddie Murray, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Tim Raines, Jim Rice, Cal Ripken, Nolan Ryan, Mike Schmidt, Tom Seaver, Ted Simmons, Lee Smith, Ozzie Smith, Willie Stargell, Bruce Sutter, Don Sutton, Alan Trammell, Dave Winfield, Carl Yastrzemski, Robin Yount




1983 (50): Sparky Anderson, Harold Baines, Johnny Bench, Bert Blyleven, Wade Boggs, George Brett, Rod Carew, Steve Carlton, Gary Carter, Bobby Cox, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Rollie Fingers, Carlton Fisk, Rich Gossage, Tony Gwynn, Rickey Henderson, Whitey Herzog, Reggie Jackson, Fergie Jenkins, Tony La Russa, Tom Lasorda, Paul Molitor, Joe Morgan, Jack Morris, Eddie Murray, Phil Niekro, Jim Palmer, Tony Perez, Gaylord Perry, Tim Raines, Jim Rice, Cal Ripken, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ryne Sandberg, Mike Schmidt, Tom Seaver, Lee Smith, Ozzie Smith, Don Sutton, Bruce Sutter, Joe Torre, Alan Trammell, Earl Weaver, Dick Williams, Dave Winfield, Carl Yastrzemski, Robin Yount



1987 (41): Sparky Anderson, Harold Baines, Yogi Berra, Bert Blyleven, Wade Boggs, George Brett, Steve Carlton, Gary Carter, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Carlton Fisk, Rich Gossage, Tony Gwynn, Rickey Henderson, Whitey Herzog, Reggie Jackson, Barry Larkin, Tony La Russa, Tom Lasorda, Paul Molitor, Jack Morris, Eddie Murray, Phil Niekro, Kirby Puckett, Tim Raines, Jim Rice, Cal Ripken, Nolan Ryan, Ryne Sandberg, Mike Schmidt, Tom Seaver, Lee Smith, Ozzie Smith, Bruce Sutter, Don Sutton, Alan Trammell, Earl Weaver, Dick Williams, Dave Winfield, Robin Yount



1990 (39): Roberto Alomar, Sparky Anderson, Harold Baines, Craig Biggio, Bert Blyleven, Wade Boggs, George Brett, Gary Carter, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Carlton Fisk, Tom Glavine, Ken Griffey Jr., Tony Gwynn, Rickey Henderson, Whitey Herzog, Randy Johnson, Barry Larkin, Tony La Russa, Tom Lasorda, Greg Maddux, Edgar Martinez, Paul Molitor, Jack Morris, Eddie Murray, Kirby Puckett, Tim Raines, Jim Rice, Cal Ripken, Frank Robinson, Nolan Ryan, Ryne Sandberg, Lee Smith, Ozzie Smith, John Smoltz, Frank Thomas, Alan Trammell, Dave Winfield, Robin Yount



1992 (43): Roberto Alomar, Sparky Anderson, Jeff Bagwell, Harold Baines, Craig Biggio, Bert Blyleven, Wade Boggs, George Brett, Gary Carter, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Carlton Fisk, Tom Glavine, Rich Gossage, Ken Griffey Jr., Tony Gwynn, Rickey Henderson, Randy Johnson, Chipper Jones, Barry Larkin, Tony La Russa, Tom Lasorda, Greg Maddux, Edgar Martinez, Paul Molitor, Jack Morris, Eddie Murray, Mike Mussina, Kirby Puckett, Tim Raines, Cal Ripken, Ivan Rodriguez, Nolan Ryan, Ryne Sandberg, Lee Smith, Ozzie Smith, John Smoltz, Frank Thomas, Jim Thome, Joe Torre, Alan Trammell, Dave Winfield, Robin Yount



1993 (43): Roberto Alomar, Sparky Anderson, Jeff Bagwell, Harold Baines, Craig Biggio, Bert Blyleven, Wade Boggs, George Brett, Gary Carter, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Carlton Fisk, Tom Glavine, Ken Griffey Jr., Tony Gwynn, Rickey Henderson, Trevor Hoffman, Randy Johnson, Chipper Jones, Barry Larkin, Tony La Russa, Greg Maddux, Edgar Martinez, Pedro Martinez, Paul Molitor, Jack Morris, Eddie Murray, Mike Mussina, Mike Piazza, Kirby Puckett, Tim Raines, Cal Ripken, Ivan Rodriguez, Nolan Ryan, Ryne Sandberg, Lee Smith, Ozzie Smith, John Smoltz, Alan Trammell, Frank Thomas, Jim Thome, Dave Winfield, Robin Yount



1996 (33): Roberto Alomar, Jeff Bagwell, Harold Baines, Craig Biggio, Wade Boggs, Andre Dawson, Dennis Eckersley, Tom Glavine, Ken Griffey Jr., Vladimir Guerrero, Tony Gwynn, Rickey Henderson, Trevor Hoffman, Randy Johnson, Chipper Jones, Barry Larkin, Greg Maddux, Edgar Martinez, Pedro Martinez, Paul Molitor, Eddie Murray, Mike Mussina, Mike Piazza, Kirby Puckett, Tim Raines, Cal Ripken, Ivan Rodriguez, Ryne Sandberg, Lee Smith, Ozzie Smith, John Smoltz, Frank Thomas, Jim Thome




2000 (27): Roberto Alomar, Jeff Bagwell, Harold Baines, Craig Biggio, Wade Boggs, Tom Glavine, Ken Griffey Jr., Vladimir Guerrero, Tony Gwynn, Roy Halladay, Rickey Henderson, Trevor Hoffman, Randy Johnson, Chipper Jones, Barry Larkin, Edgar Martinez, Pedro Martinez, Greg Maddux, Mike Mussina, Mike Piazza, Tim Raines, Cal Ripken, Ivan Rodriguez, Mariano Rivera, John Smoltz, Frank Thomas, Jim Thome



2003 (26): Roberto Alomar, Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Bobby Cox, Tom Glavine, Ken Griffey Jr., Vladimir Guerrero, Roy Halladay, Rickey Henderson, Trevor Hoffman, Randy Johnson, Chipper Jones, Barry Larkin, Tony LaRussa, Greg Maddux, Edgar Martinez, Pedro Martinez, Mike Mussina, Mike Piazza, Mariano Rivera, Frank Robinson, Ivan Rodriguez, John Smoltz, Frank Thomas, Jim Thome, Joe Torre



OK, big news. With Ted Simmons' selection that means the 1983 Topps set has hit 50 Hall of Famers!

It will be interesting to see if any set catches the '83 set but for now here is the top three:

1. 1983 Topps (50)
2. 1969 Topps (47)
2. 1971 Topps (47)
2. 1972 Topps (47)

I guess that's a top four.

I made a few slight adjustments for this latest installment.

First, with the addition of the 1973 Topps set, I decided that I would keep the qualifying cards to only cards of players or managers who were actively playing or managing at the time the card was issued (or recently retired). So I didn't include any of the All-Time Greats subset in the '73 Topps totals. I didn't think that would be a fair representation of MLB at that time.

I also didn't include any of the Hall of Famers who showed up on the manager cards as coaches in the '73 set, such as Bill Mazeroski. He didn't get his own card so therefore, he doesn't get included (however, I am keeping Hall of Famers who showed up on multi-player rookie cards, such as Gary Carter and Jim Rice on the '75 rookie prospects cards. They were active players and that's different).

That '73 decision meant I had to go back and eliminate a few previous qualifiers from the 1960 set. Bill Dickey, Luke Appling and Bob Lemon all appear in the 1960 set as coaches on those multi-coach cards. Since they didn't have their own card in the set and weren't playing, I won't consider them.

Finally, as is always with this exercise, I found a a goof. Somehow, Rickey Henderson was left out of the 1992 Topps list. So I added him back and upped the '92 Topps total.

This is always an undertaking and because I recently changed my blog layout, I had to RETYPE all of the entries because copy-and-pasting leaves that ugly white-background effect on the blog (no chance I go through and retype the previous Most Hall of Famers posts though). So if you see typos, that's why.

Every once in awhile, I get a comment on these posts, something to the effect of "hey, there's an easier way to do this" and that's all fine and good. But I'm not anxious for a RIGHT NOW answer with this. I want to take my time.


Much like the Hall of Fame voting, people are anxious for their player to get in RIGHT NOW. They're not good at waiting, especially if they view their favorite as overdue for selection.

I get that, but take it up with the Hall and its voting rules. I'd rather focus on the people who did get in -- the people folks had long campaigned for Hall selection and now that they're in, they ignore that to focus on WHO ELSE GOT ROBBED?

I'd rather be happy about baseball when I have the chance. Congrats to Ted Simmons and Marvin Miller.

By the way I've always loved Simba's 1977 Topps card, too. It features one of those 1976 Cardinals pillbox caps that are all too rare in the '77 Topps set. I look at this card and wish Simmons had it on his head.

Comments

Nachos Grande said…
For future reference, you can paste as plain text (or if it's easier, first copy and paste into Notepad and then copy what's in Notepad and paste it into your blog. I have the same issue with my current blog set-up but that's the workaround I've found. Much easier than retyping everything!

On a different note, I think it's kind of sad that as baseball fan I know next-to-nothing about Ted Simmons.
BaseSetCalling said…
Catchers so hot right now - lots of early signings this hot stove season.

I think the pendulum is swinging back a little on expectations from Catchers in the data age, with so much talk of and now stats for ‘framing’. And lots of weight given to a Catcher’s relationship with a starting rotation, which blew up publicly for the Mets this year.

But I am glad Simmons went in, and went in now. If it didn’t happen before 2025, when Yadi gets his first votes, the topic would become insufferable.

Oh and I appreciated my new knowledge about Simmons and motorcycles. I saw the Yount motorcycle card online recently, and it reminded me about a lot of fan whining about a baseball star and motorcycles - Bumgarner.
CinciCuse Bill said…
Congrats to Simmons and Miller. Can't believe Simmons didn't get past the first round on his first dance. Was hoping Parker would get the call too. Love HoF talk.

Retype?1?1 Yikes!
Billy Kingsley said…
I know you aren't interested in an easier way, but the Trading Card Database tells you for every set. Not just base sets but inserts, parallels, promos, etc. Of course, it would include the people you leave out so there would still be some thinking involved.
night owl said…
Yes, I was told this before. I use it as a tool, but it's not exactly what I want and you can't get multiple posts out of it if you write just one that says: "Here's what Trading Card Database Says!" I'm enjoying the journey.
Fuji said…
Was very happy to read this news about Simmons getting in yesterday. A while back, you left a comment on one of my posts about that 75T card. Now I get it.
Alan Deakins said…
-Awesome blog entry/post.....My first 1976 card,bought in the early 90s, was Ted Simmons. I got it out of a dime or quarter box at the local card shop/shoppette. I was looking for vintage cards of players I knew. I ended up buying alot of vintage cards from this store including my first Rocky Colavito/Leon Wagner card, 1967 Topps, and my first 1956 Topps card, Russ Meyer....I dont think I paid more than maybe .50 for any of them...That shop was great and the owners always tried to tell stories about the vintage players or sets to the kids that would buy them out of the cheap boxes. I ended up completing the 1976 Topps set last year. I will probably always identify '76 Topps with Mr. Ted Simmons and not those impossible to find Sporting News All Time Greats Cards...
Old Cards said…
Great post!! This post was particularly interesting to me, because I have just recently started to look at my current collection from a HOF perspective.
Commishbob said…
The voters got it right with Simmons and Marvin Miller. Both richly deserving (even if Miller didn't want it). I thought Lou Whitaker should have been elected as well but I'm hoping for that to happen next time.

That '77 Simmons card is terrific!
Old Cards said…
If a manager makes the HOF as a manager, do player cards of him really count as Hall of Famer cards? Examples you listed - 1959 Sparky Anderson, 1959, 1960 and 1963 Whitey Herzog (of course, he had other player cards you did not list).
night owl said…
I'm counting the managers' playing days cards toward the HOF tally. I may reconsider that, but for now they count.
Old Cards said…
The Trading Card Database counts them too.

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